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Concrete Screed Visit

Tom had a chance to visit with a new TTI Screedright Pro customer last fall. Dean is a small business owner who needed to do some quick concrete flat work in a mobile home park. The Screedright Pro was just the tool he needed to do the job. Dean formed up and poured several driveway aprons. He was able to simplify the job by screeding off the 12 X 24 foot slab with the Screedright Pro.  One man running the screed is a lot easier than having two on the screed bar.  Each slab was poured in a matter of minutes. The TTI Screedright Pro utilizes a wooden 2 X 4 to screed off wet concrete. There are no expensive aluminum screed bars to purchase. The all steel frame is light weight and easy to move from job to job. The TTI Screedright Pro is manufactured and shipped from Trade Tool Innovations in Wyoming. The screed arrives via UPS in one box and is easy to assemble and begin use. Please visit www.toolsbytom.com for more information. Call 307-745-9488 if you have questions or would like to purchase!

 

 

Decorative Concrete Patios

A couple of months ago I posted an example of a concrete driveway enhanced by a decorative stamped edge. Alongside that photo was an example of a regular concrete driveway. The decorative driveway was more appealing than the plain concrete driveway and the same can be done with a back patio as well.
Rodrigo from Nevada sent in these photos of some work he had completed using the TTI Screedright Pro concrete screed.

This concrete patio was first formed up using a flexible forming system. Either an outside curb was formed first or Rodrigo simply leveled off the concrete in one flat pour. The crew used concrete stamps to obtain a cool texture to the concrete patio. Control joints were cut into the slabs to prevent undue cracking along the concrete slab. After the concrete had time to dry, the crew used concrete stain to place color on the patio. The rounder patio has a darker brown edging that helps the star in the middle to pop.

The rectangular patio was first formed up using wood forms. The concrete was screeded off and then allowed to settle some before stamps and color were added to it as well. I am a bit stumped as to how they obtained the “marbling” design in this example. Anyone out there in concrete world, please pipe in if you know how Rodrigo obtained that look!
And as always, happy screeding!

Sealed Stamped Concrete

Here is an update to my previous post on stamped concrete. The concrete contractor added a colored seal to the edging of the new concrete driveway for a new construction home. The contractor also included a little landscaping in the new home package.

The first thing to consider when looking for a concrete sealer is to examine weather the sealer will be applied indoors or outdoors.  For this project, the contractor was looking for a product specific for outdoor use.  Your product should have good UV resistance and also be waterproof.    Usually an area like this gets a lot of foot and vehicle traffic and the new homeowner should consider applying a new coating every couple of years or so.

New Construction: To Stamp or Not to Stamp?

I try and take a walk pretty much everyday. I have noticed a couple of new homes going up in our neighborhood. These are fairly similar homes, although one is a bit more high end then the other. Both driveways were poured about the same time. On one house, the contractor decided to stamp the edges and accompanying sidewalk. The other house has a traditional non-stamped drive. The stamped driveway does take a little more time and money to complete. On a new construction, it shouldn’t take that much extra effort though.

The first few steps are basically the same.  Forming the slab and sidewalk with wooden or plastic forms.  The concrete is poured, screeded off and floated in the same manner as well.  If a concrete contractor is looking to add extra decorative design, he or she will allow the concrete to dry just enough to be able to apply the concrete stamp.  At this point, the contractor can apply color if desired.  The stamp is usually a small rubber  form that lays over the concrete and is moved around to form a pattern.

More and more homeowners are adding a stamped design to their new construction as a way to spruce up the look of their landscaping.  What do you think?  Do you like the stamped look or a more traditional concrete flat work?